Posts Tagged ‘hiking in Glacier National Park’

Glacier National Park Hiking

July 8th, 2013 by teresa

hidden lakeHidden Lake Overlook

Location:                  Logan Pass

Distance:                  3 miles round-trip

Duration:                  2 hours

Elevation Gain:       550 foot gain

Effort:                          Moderate

Trailhead:                  behind Logan Pass Visitor Center

This hike begins at Logan Pass and has totally unobstructed views the entire way.  On the back side of the Visitor Center, after climbing the stairs, stay towards the right and you will find the Hanging Gardens Trailhead. The trail is most referred to as Hidden Lake Nature Trail. Most of the first section of the trail is on a boardwalk to prevent visitors stepping on fragile alpine plants. The trail ends with a tremendous view of Hidden Lake located in a glacier-carved cirque surrounded by amazing peaks. This is one of the best short hikes you could possibly do and there is a superb chance of seeing mountain goats as well. To avoid the crowds we recommend taking this hike in the morning.

 

Glacier National Park Concessioner Schedules 2013

May 19th, 2013 by teresa

WEST GLACIER, MONT. – The 2013 operating dates for concessioners operating in Glacier National Park are scheduled. These concessioners, who work under contract within Glacier National Park, provide visitor services including lodging, food service, retail shops, tours, transportation, horseback riding, guided day hikes and backpacking trips, boat tours and small boat rentals. Services are listed in alphabetical order.

Belton Chalets, Inc.

(1-888-345-2649 or www.sperrychalet.com orwww.graniteparkchalet.com) Backcountry Chalets:

Location Opening Closing
Granite Park Chalet* June 29 September 9 (after breakfast)
Sperry Chalet** July 11 September 9 (after breakfast)

*The historic Granite Park Chalet is available for overnight use as a rustic hiker shelter.

**Services at the historic Sperry Chalet include traditional overnight accommodations and food service for overnight guests and day hikers with meal reservations.

Glacier Park Boat Company (406-257-2426 orwww.glacierparkboats.com) Boat tours and rentals:

Location Opening Closing
Apgar (rentals only) June 1 September 2
Lake McDonald May 25 September 22
Many Glacier June 14 September 15
Rising Sun (tours only) June 22 September 2
Two Medicine June 8 September 8


Glacier Park, Inc.
 (GPI) (Central reservations:  406-892-2525 or www.glacierparkinc.com) Front country lodging, food and beverage services, retail, tour and transportation services:

Location Opening Closing
Lake McDonald Lodge & Camp Store May 25 September 29 (after breakfast)
Jammer Joe’s Restaurant June 29 September 2 (after dinner)
Many Glacier Hotel June 12 September 22 (after breakfast)
Rising Sun Motor Inn & Camp Store June 21 September 15 (after breakfast)
Swiftcurrent Motor Inn June 18 September 16 (after breakfast)
Swiftcurrent Campstore June 18 September 16 (closes at noon)
Two Medicine Camp Store May 31 September 2 (open all day)
Village Inn May 30 September 16 (after check-out)
Red Bus Tours Tours operate the same dates as the hotels.
Hiker Shuttle July 1 September 2
East-Side Shuttle June 8 September 22

Glacier Guides, Inc. (1-800-521-RAFT or 406-387-5555 or www.glacierguides.com) Day hikes and backpacking:

Location Opening Closing
Various Locations May October

Sun Tours (1-800-786-9220 or 406-226-9220 orwww.glaciersuntours.com) Road-based tours highlighting Blackfeet culture and history:

Location Opening Closing
Various Locations May 15 October 15

 

Swan Mountain Outfitters (1-877-888-5557 orwww.swanmountainoutfitters.com/glacier) Horseback rides:

Location Opening Closing
Apgar May 25 September 2
Lake McDonald June 1 September 29
Many Glacier June 15 September 15

 

Waterton Inter-Nation Shoreline Cruises, LTD (403-859-2362 or www.watertoncruise.com) Waterton Lake boat tours:

Location Opening Closing
Goat Haunt Landing June 1 September 22

 

There are also several privately-owned facilities in Apgar Village that offer lodging, dining, camping supplies, groceries, and gifts from May through much of September, some year round.

For reservations and details, please call respective phone numbers listed. For general park information, please visit the park’s website at: http://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htmor call park headquarters at 406-888-7800.

 

- NPS -

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(photo courtesy Glacier Country)

 

The Crown of the Continent

April 26th, 2013 by teresa

The Flathead Valley is the magnificent gateway to the west entrance of Glacier National Park – a park so naturally beautiful it is known as the “Crown Jewel of the Continent”.  Glacier was established largely through the influence of railroad magnate James J. Hill, who envisioned a North American tourist destination, comparable to the Swiss Alps, for travelers on his Great Northern Railway.

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Crown of the Continent

The Crown of the Continent is the vast ecosystem stretching from the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex north to British Columbia, Alberta and Canada’s Waterton Lakes National Park. Combined, Waterton and Glacier form the only trans-boundary “peace park” in North America.

Exceptional natural beauty is preserved in Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park, and is a result of dynamic ongoing natural processes. Because of this the parks have been jointly designated a World Heritage Site, an honor shared with the Taj Mahal, The Great Barrier Reef and the Egyptian Pyramids.

What Glacier has to Offer

Visitors to Glacier National Park enjoy the park’s 1 million acres of lakes, sweeping valleys and glacier carved mountains. Glacier is 40 miles wide from east to west, and 50 miles long north to south.

A complete suite of wildlife that includes wolves, grizzly bears, lynx and other natural predators sets Glacier apart from nearly every other national park. Glacier has 272 bird species, 63 different mammals, 23 fish species, five types of amphibians and three types of reptiles.

The park has a rich variety of flora as well. There are 1,270 vascular plant varieties, 880 mosses and lichens, 130 non-native plant species and 20 tree species.

Mountains, Lakes and Streams

The highest point in Glacier is Mount Cleveland, at 10,466’ and the lowest is the Middle Fork River near West Glacier at 3,215’. At an elevation of 6,646 ‘, Logan Pass is the highest point in the park accessible by vehicle.

There are more than 175 named mountains in the park, six of them over 10,000′ and 43 over 9,000’. The Continental Divide, the mountainous backbone that sends water either to the east or west, meanders 106 miles through the park.

There are 762 lakes in Glacier, and only 131 of them are named. They cover 30,022 surface acres, with 392 miles of total shoreline. Lake McDonald is the largest at 6,823 acres, followed by St. Mary Lake at 3,923 acres, Bowman Lake at 1,706 acres and Kintla Lake at 1,698 acres.

There are 563 streams or rivers in Glacier covering 1,513 stream miles. The longest is McDonald Creek, which stretches 25.8 miles.

Archaeological evidence of use by ancient American Indians indicates Glacier’s cultural history dates back at least 10,000 years. The first Europeans to explore the area were fur trappers who are believed to have arrived in the late 1700s.

Go to the Sun

With the exception of Going-to-the-Sun Road, most roads are limited to the park’s exterior, while an extensive trail network winds through the interior. The park has 168 miles of road, six entrances and 730 miles of trails.

The Going-to-the-Sun Road is a scenic landmark crossing between the west entrance near the Flathead Valley and the east entrance at St. Mary via Logan Pass. The 50-mile paved road was completed in the 1930’s. In 1983, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Places and in 1996 was designated a National Landmark. The road is narrow, steep and winding, with numerous pullouts for viewing scenery. Travelers should plan to spend 1½ to 3 hours to complete the distance.

Weather and snow determine when Logan Pass opens and closes. Most portions of the Going-to-the-Sun road are open year-round. Logan Pass opens in mid-June and closes in mid-October.

The Flathead Valley provides an outstanding base camp for exploring Glacier National Park with its large number of restaurants, activities, attractions and services geared to the traveler.

Located only eight miles from the west entrance to Glacier National Park, the Historic Tamarack Lodge and Cabins offers traditional lodge room accommodation in our 100 yr old lodge, one of the original visitor centres belonging to the park.  We also offer 22 private cabins.  With great rates and clean and comfortable accommodation, check availability and book your stay today for a Glacier National Park vacation of a lifetime.

For general park information such as maps, Web cams and bear safety information, check the following park Internet links to help you find answers to your questions:

US Park Service website
Fee Free Days 2013
Facebook
Twitter
Flickr
Web cams

Maps

Natural resources

Bear information

Park publications

Park news

Park photos

GNP FAQs

 

Glacier National Park Free Entry

April 16th, 2013 by teresa

National Park Week April 22-26 means no entrance fees at Glacier National Park!

Spring is an awesome time to visit and enjoy spring in the Rockies.  Low lodging rates and deals and specials will help you budget for the trip of a lifetime and no crowds mean you get to enjoy the  scenery hassle-free.

Other Fee-Free Days for 2013 include:

  • August 25 (97th Birthday of the National Park Service)
  • September 28 (Public Lands Day)
  • November 9-11 (Veteran’s Day Weekend)

Regular entrance fees are:

7-Day Single Entry Permit  - $12  (May 1 – October 31) / $10 (November 1 – April 30)

(per person for a visitor traveling on foot, bicycle, motorcycle, or for individuals traveling together in a vehicle as a non-commercial, organized group. The permit is non-transferable)

 7-Day Automobile/Vehicle Permit  - $25 (May 1 – October 31) / $15 (November 1 – April 30)

(flat fee for all persons traveling in a single, private, non-commercial vehicle (car/truck/van). The permit is non-transferable)

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Bear Spray Honor System

October 15th, 2012 by teresa

Our guests love to tell us about the wildlife they see whilst visiting Glacier National Park.  It is often a highlight of their stay and we LOVE to hear how you are enjoying our backyard!  However, please be sensible. Caution is advised whilst exploring the area as these are wild animals and can behave unpredictably.  Always pay attention to advice from Park Rangers and take good care out there!

Most animals will naturally avoid contact with humans – but some of our guests like to be prepared and choose to carry bear spray, especially when hiking in the more remote areas.

For our guests benefit, we follow an honor system with our bear spray.  We have many canisters of bear spray at front desk available to our guests free of charge.  This saves anywhere from $35.00 to $50.00 due to the fact that there is no need to purchase.

Don’t forget to pay it forward and let us have any remaining bear spray for the next guests to benefit.

 

Free Entrance Days. Hiking in Glacier National Park.

November 11th, 2011 by HTL

Veteran’s Day brings free entrance to Glacier National Park for the whole weekend of November 11-13.  A fantastic opportunity to explore the trails before the snow falls.

Glacier has more than 740 miles of trails so you are sure to find something to meet your needs whether seeking summit views, wildlife watching or a gentle stroll that gets you out and active.

Looking for an easy route to include the kids?  Visit The Best Easy Hikes in Glacier for some suggestions.  Our tip at the lodge is Avalanche Lake.  Even our youngest, at three years of age, made this with only a little help!

Stroller or wheelchair?  No problem.  Trail of the Cedars is fully accessible and offers an up close and personal encounter with rushing water at the Avalanche Gorge, mighty red cedar trees and the forest floor.  Highly recommended!

Rumour has it that every day spent at Fifty Mountain Pass will add a year to your life.  Check it out via the North Circle Route, voted ‘Best Alpine Hike’ by backpacker.com National Parks Hall of Fame.

Whatever route you choose, please be prepared!  Dress sensibly, hydrate and ensure that you hike with a partner or leave a detailed itinerary (if you must hike alone). Be sure to check in with Park Visitor Centers to ensure you have up to date information on trail accessibility, weather advisories and other relevant information.

 


Hiking in Glacier National Park

March 12th, 2010 by HTL

One of the most popular activities, and one that is accessible to all, is hiking the local area.  Glacier National Park has in excess of 700 trails, from the wheelchair accessible boardwalk of The Trail of the Cedars to overnight excursions into the peaks of the back country and plenty in between.

Favorites of our guests include: Avalanche Lake (2 miles); Hidden Lake (1.5 miles to the overlook, a further 1.5 miles down to the lake itself); and The Highline (featured in the youtube clip Hiking in Glacier National Park – The Highline).

Beyond the park itself, and for the more intrepid hiker why not try The Great Northern ?  8 miles up to an elevation of 8,600 feet with views over the Bob Marshall Wilderness.

Let us help you plan your trip, with up-to-date local information and a whole heap of maps, our staff are always ready and eager to help make your stay the best it can be and to ensure you leave with memories that will last a lifetime.  With views like this, it makes our job easy !!

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