Posts Tagged ‘winter’

How to spot winter wildlife in Glacier National Park.

November 29th, 2015 by teresa

As the crowds of visitors recede and winter settles over Glacier National Park, the new found calm and quiet makes for an ideal environment to spot the park’s many inhabitants as they move about their habitats.

Many of the animals in the park have stealthy winter camouflage, which can make spotting them a fun challenge.  That said, one of the benefits of wildlife spotting in winter is that many critters that usually move to the highlands in warm weather (to forage and get away from humans) will come down to the milder, more accessible lowlands in winter.

While bears spend a good portion of the season hibernating, the park’s 65 other mammals like elk , red fox, white-tailed deer, and bald eagles come out to play in the winter wonderland giving visitors outstanding photo opportunities and great memories.  No selfies though! Stay safe and be sure to stay well away from wildlife (the law is 300 feet from bears, 75 feet from other animals) but don’t be afraid to keep your eyes open and look for these telltale signs of furry and feathered park inhabitants.



1. Check for Tracks 

The snow forms a perfect canvas to check out animal tracks, with fresh, well-defined footprints telling a detailed story of passersby. You don’t have to be an expert tracker to pick up on what the tracks mean. Does the animal have claws, paws, do they hop or run, how many toes? See what you can discover just by observing.  

2. Look to the Water 

When lakes and streams freeze, any liquid water draws animals like crazy. This makes springs and thin-iced lake-sides the ideal place to spot thirsty animals in their own habitat, taking a sip of that refreshing, icy water.

Lake McDonald in the Winter

Glacier National Park in the Wintertime

3. Scat 

No, we don’t mean skidaddle. While in the summer, animal scat blends in with the undergrowth, the bright white snow makes it easy to spot in winter. Small pellets in a cluster? Probably a deer. The bigger the scat, the bigger the animal that left it behind. If you look closely you may be able to tell what’s on the menu during winter in Glacier National Park.
Book a stay today and take your family on a tour of our winter wonderland.  We guarantee great memories and outstanding views, all year round.

5 things to remember when you snowshoe Glacier National Park

November 27th, 2015 by teresa

Have you tried Snowshoeing yet?  Fun for all the family, and easy to do,it is also an amazing way to get in some snow-covered mountain time while accessing pristine spots in Glacier National Park, even when areas are closed to vehicle traffic. Food coma from too much festive fun? You can’t beat a workout with views like this:stnick

As we’re gearing up for the winter season to start we are busy getting ready for snow.  Thoughts begin to turn to fun activities and great ways to get out into our backyard, and snowshoeing is one of our favorite ways to explore. These tips and tricks help make the snowy path to winter recreation a little easier:

1. Keep a slightly wider stance

Try not to exaggerate this too much, but keeping your legs slightly farther apart than normal gives you more balance as you walk.

2. Kick-step going uphill

This technique helps you get the most traction going uphill in fluffy powder, without sliding back down. Lift up your foot and kick into the slope with your toe so the crampons dig into the hill right under the ball of your foot.

3. Bend your knees

Going downhill can make you feel like leaning back and tensing up, but don’t lock your knees! Keeping them gently bent helps you maintain balance and stay stable.

4. Stay to the side of ski tracks

Showing respect for others using the trail is key when snowshoeing on shared trails with cross country skiers. Since snowshoes have an easier and safer time moving to the side, skis have the right of way on joint trails, so step aside and wave hello when others pass.  

5. Remember to walk naturally!

You’ve read all these tips, you’ve strapped some snowshoes on, but don’t forget, snowshoeing is really just walking. Put one foot in front of the other and try to be as natural as possible.

Rent snowshoes at the lodge and explore the Beaver Pond area behind our property.  Find your groove and then head out into Glacier National Park, or onto the many trails of the Flathead National Forest.  Ask our staff about the best trails for your ability, we’ll be happy to help!

Here’s some helpful links to get you started:

5 things to do in Glacier National Park when the snow flies

November 6th, 2015 by teresa

Lake McDonald in the Winter

Glacier National Park in the Wintertime

Winter is a fabulous season to experience Glacier National Park.  The snow caps dazzle on the mountains, everything is still and peaceful and the busy sounds of civilization are muffled by a blanket of snow.  There’s no better time to relax, reflect on the past year and make plans for times still to come.

Glacier National Park is open ALL year round and offers an abundance of activities regardless of the season.  Here’s just five things to get you out there and experiencing the beauty of snow season:

  • Snowshoeing – a traditional way to cross snow covered terrain, snowshoeing is suitable for all the family and allows you to experience the extraordinary silence of the Park in Wintertime.  Take a ranger-led snowshoe for the skinny on all the behind the scenes activity during snow season.
  • Nordic Skiing – A great way to get a full-body workout whilst getting a lungful of that clear mountain air!  A popular place to ski in the Park is the Camas Road, but dependent on your level of experience and yearning for adventure, there are unlimited options for you to choose from.
  • Photography – Winter brings the contrast that makes for perfect shots for aspiring Ansel Adams’.  The added bonus is that you get to experience the landscapes in 3D for new inspiration and perspective.
  • Sightseeing – the Going-to-the-Sun Road is typically plowed up to the Avalanche Creek pullout, enabling visitors of all ages and physical conditions to travel through breathtaking scenery including the shores of Lake McDonald and the glittering peaks that lie beyond. Beachcombers can explore the shoreline at Apgar and at Lake McDonald Lodge and there are plenty of places for visitors to bundle up and reflect on the views.
  • Wildlife spotting – while the bears may hibernate, there are plenty of Winter residents to be found such as snowshoe hares, deer, chipmunks and eagles.

When you are all done adventuring, choose your favorite toddy from the bar and curl up beside a roaring fire in the lodge.  We have all you might need for a relaxing break far from the madding crowd.

Glacier National Park Winter Lodging

September 6th, 2013 by teresa

Collage_FotoFlexer_PhotoLooking for a winter mountain retreat?  Relocating and need lodging while you search for your perfect home? Our cabins are available for long-term rental on a monthly basis from October 1st through April 30th for prices starting at $500 including utilities.  All cabin types available from one bed unit cabins with private bath, refrigerator and microwave through to our new studio cabins with full sized, fully equipped kitchen to our largest, two bedroom cabins.  Whatever your needs, you can rest assured that we have a cabin available at rates to suit. Linen and laundry are available at extra cost, our facility is plowed through the snow season and we are located right on Highway 2 for easy access.  Don’t forget, our backyard is the Flathead National Forest with groomed trails that provide awesome opportunities for snow shoes, xc ski and snowmobiling.

Contact us on 877-387-4420 to get up-to-date info on rates and availability.


Winter at the Historic Tamarack Lodge!

November 26th, 2010 by HTL

Each season brings its own rewards in our corner of northwest Montana.  Winter brings the snow and holiday landscapes like no other.  Our facility is plowed on a daily basis to ensure your safety and, as we are right on Highway 2 which is also regularly plowed, we are also safely accessible.  Taking the train?  Ask us about transportation.

Once you are here there is plenty to do.  Snowshoes are available from front desk staff – take a trip to the beaver pond behind our property, or venture into Glacier National Park or the Flathead National Forest Trails.

For cross-country skiers there is also an abundance of possibilities with groomed trails all around us. That’s 1,000,000 acres of Glacier National Park and 3,000,000 acres of National Forest and Wilderness area…we dare you to get bored with that!

Nearby Whitefish caters to every level of downhill skier or snowboarder as well as offering apres ski at the top of the mountain or in the picturesque town below whereas Blacktail Mountain offers uncrowded slopes and a family atmosphere at reduced rates.  Ski them both and tell us your preference!

We have snowmobiles!  We work closely with local rental firms to ensure you are provided the levels of service we pride ourselves on at the lodge.  New for this year is the opening of the Desert Mountain trailhead to guided snowmobiling.  Treat yourself to panoramic views of Glacier National Park from the summit, then wind your way back down the trail to the frozen reservoir at Emory Bay.  A great family trip, even better taken by moonlight.

Too much activity?  Not a problem!  Stay with us and enjoy the tranquility and relaxation that is unique to Winter in our area of the world.  Enjoy a hot chocolate while sinking into the armchair at the lodge with a good book.  Read about our history or enjoy a Western romance novel, whatever you choose.

Its your vacation … let us help you plan your dream getwaway, whether its a retreat from the stresses and strains of everyday life, a romantic winter weekend away from the kids, or a family snow sports vacation, we can help.

Don’t leave all the fun til Summer!

Whitefish, Montana

February 11th, 2010 by HTL

Less than 30 minutes drive from your accommodation at The Historic Tamarack Lodge and Cabins is the picturesque town of Whitefish.

A 30min drive from The Historic Tamarack Lodge and Cabins.

Originally a railroad town, Whitefish is now probably better known for its ski resort on Whitefish Mountain.  In the Winter months there is plenty of winter sports activity whether on the downhill ski slopes or snowmobiling the mountains beyond. Down from the mountain the town is served by the historic Amtrak station and a number of boutique shops, restaurants and bars for apres ski.

In the Summer months, Whitefish Mountain turns into an adventure playground of a different kind with zip line tours, an alpine slide and a boardwalk high in the treetops. There are many opportunities for water sports on Whitefish Lake, and to bask in the beauty of the surroundings on the City Beach.  An abundance of local produce is available at the weekly Farmer’s Market, and, as an artist’s town, there are numerous opportunities for Art Walks of the many galleries. Let your own creativity flow at the Stumptown Art Studio and paint your own pottery to take home as a unique souvenir of your stay, then round off your day by returning home to an evening of hospitality at the lodge.

Relax by the fireplace in the Main Lodge